On Transmuting Life Into Truth

Emerson had this to say in "The American Scholar" (one of my all-time favorite essays along with... all of Emerson's other essays): The scholar of the first age received into him the world around; brooded thereon; gave it the new arrangement of his own mind, and uttered it again. It came into him, life; it went out from him, truth. It came to him, short-lived actions; it went out from him, immortal thoughts. It came to him, business; it went from him, poetry. It was dead fact; now, it is quick thought. It can stand, and it can go. It now endures, it now flies, it now inspires. Precisely in proportion to the depth of mind from which it issued, so high does it soar, so long does it sing. Or, I might say, it depends on how far the process had gone, of transmuting life into truth.

Posted on February 28, 2011 and filed under Life Adventure, Optimism, Poetic Inquiry.